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    Kriwacki: News Releases & Feature Stories

     
    07/02/2014
    Protein’s structural shift offers clues to tumor suppression and other key cell functions

    A St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital study identifies the mechanism underlying a shape-shifting protein that assists in tumor suppression; results could aid cancer drug development. (Dr. Richard Kriwacki, PhD)

     
     
    05/15/2014
    Detailed studies reveal how key cancer-fighting protein is held in check

    St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital analysis reveals how the protein p53, which triggers cancer cells to commit suicide, attaches to its regulatory molecule; findings could lead to drugs to unleash p53 to battle a range of cancers. (Richard Kriwacki, PhD, and Douglas Green, PhD)

     
     
    03/25/2009
    New insights into the cell’s cancer-suppressing machinery

    The p53 protein plays an immensely important role in protecting the body from cancer. Dubbed the cell’s guardian of the genome, p53 is constantly poised to detect potentially tumor-causing DNA damage.

     
     
    03/12/2007
    Disorderly protein brings order to cell division

    The secret to the ability of a molecule critical for cell division to throw off the protein yoke that restrains its activity is the yoke itself--a disorderly molecule that seems to have a mind of its own.

     
     
    11/13/2006
    First major study of mammalian "disorderly" proteins

    St. Jude technique for producing cell extracts will help lead to studies of the roles these molecules play in both normal functions and in disease.

     
     
    01/12/2006
    Collapse of protein bridge can cause disease

    The disruption of a molecular bridge that holds together the molecule p53 tends to destabilize this protein, allowing it to form potentially disease-causing aggregates, or "clumps."

     
     
    02/17/2005
    Discovery could lead to improved bacterial pneumonia vaccine

    Scientists at St. Jude have discovered that the structure of a protein on the surface of pneumonia bacteria helps these germs invade the human bloodstream, which may lead to a more effective pneumonia vaccine.

     
     
    04/28/2004
    Order from Disorder

    St. Jude investigators have demonstrated for the first time that many proteins exploit disorderliness in their structure to perform various jobs.

     
     
    05/29/2003
    Following the Clues

    Why are children in southern Brazil more susceptible to a rare type of cancer than children in other parts of the world? St. Jude researchers and clinicians spend more than a decade unraveling the mystery.