Patient Safety

"Do you know ..." is an educational series for patients and their families.

IV pump safety for patients

During your child's treatment at St. Jude, she may spend many hours hooked to an IV (intravenous) pump. It is important for you to know what the pump is, how it is used, and some guidelines for its safe use.

Preventing falls

Certain situations and medical conditions can put your child at a greater risk for falling...

Preventing falls in outpatient areas

The staff of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital wants you to know that certain situations and medical conditions can put your child at a greater risk for falling. It is important for you to know these risks and to take action to prevent your child from being injured.

Protecting caregivers from drug hazards

This handout provides guidelines for handling drugs that could pose a health risk to the caregiver.

Safety in the home

St. Jude wants you to know that certain situations and medical conditions can increase your child’s risk of injury in the home.

Sleep safety for infants and toddlers

Using the right beds for patients younger than 36 months old helps ensure their safety and decreases their risk for infection. To help ensure your child’s safety, you need to understand the hospital’s policy for bed safety for infants and toddlers.

Tennessee law: Child safety in cars

Tennessee state law requires that all people riding in vehicles must wear safety belts. Children who are 8 years or younger or who are shorter than 4 feet 9 inches must sit in a child passenger restraint system, also known as a child safety seat.

Throwing away sharp objects safely

Parents and other caregivers often use sharp objects, such as needles and syringes, to care for sick children at home. If these sharp objects are not thrown away safely, they can cause injury, illness, and pollution.

Travel after sedation or anesthesia

This handout provides guidelines for traveling with your child after she has received anesthesia or sedation.

Use of restraints

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital staff members work to provide comfort, security, and safety to your child in the least restrictive ways possible. There may be a time when we need to restrict your child’s freedom of movement for his own safety or to prevent your child from hurting himself or others.