Country Cares radiothon volunteers at work

Country Cares radiothons going strong

Take two parts country music, mix in stories about St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, sprinkle with enthusiastic radio personalities and then cover with a generous audience of country music and what do you get? You get a great big helping of Country Cares for St. Jude Kids®, which is precisely how the 2004 Country Cares radio season has been going.

Coast to coast, listeners of country radio have lit up the phone lines with their calls, pledging to help St. Jude in its quest to eradicate childhood catastrophic diseases such as cancer.

Atlanta, Georgia’s KICKS 101.5 (WKHX) set the tone for the year’s season by shattering the record for first-year radiothons. The station raised $1.1 million during its two-day radiothon on Feb. 5-6, becoming the only station ever to break $1 million in its first year.

Two more records fell just two weeks later, when K102 (KEEY) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, raised more than $1.4 million for St. Jude, the most money ever generated from one radiothon. The total also made K102 the first station to top $1 million for three consecutive years.

But records are not what the Country Cares radiothons are about. It is about the compassion of listeners who seek to help St. Jude continue its research to eliminate pediatric cancer and to help ensure that the family of every child treated at St. Jude never has to worry about a bill. ALSAC/St. Jude covers all costs not covered by insurance for treatment rendered at St. Jude. Families without insurance are never asked to pay.

“We are thrilled that listeners of country radio have shown St. Jude so much generosity this radio season,” said Teri Watson, director of Radio and Entertainment Marketing for ALSAC, the fund-raising arm of St. Jude. “For the past 15 years, the Country Cares radio program has grown tremendously. From the artists to the listeners, St. Jude is honored to have the support of the country music industry in the fight against childhood cancer.”

 

March 2004