Prevent and Control Infection

"Do you know ..." is an educational series for patients and their families.

ACU isolation to help prevent infection

Many St. Jude patients are at greater risk for infection. For the safety of all patients, please tell the staff about any illness your child might have that could be spread to others (contagious). St. Jude has an isolation area in the Ambulatory Care Unit (ACU) for children who have illnesses that could spread to others.

About Aspergillus Fungal Infections

Aspergillus is a fungus that is always present in the air. The pneumonia caused by Aspergillus is serious, and current treatments do not work as well as we would like. Follow these guidelines at home to protect your child from infection.

About Candida Fungal Infections

Patients with low blood counts are at risk for a Candida infection. In this handout, see how to prevent infection.

About Chickenpox

Chickenpox can be very serious in a child with an immune system that has been weakened by cancer therapy or other immune problems.

Airborne precautions

There are different types of infections, and they require different types of isolation. This handout gives hospital guidelines for airborne precautions.

Clean Hands

The easiest and most important thing you can do to prevent infection is to clean your hands often.

Clean Wagons

Most of our younger patients enjoy riding in wagons to their St. Jude appointments. We need your help to be sure that the wagons are as safe as they can be.

Contact precautions

There are different types of infections, and they require different types of isolation. This handout gives hospital guidelines for contact precautions.

Controlling the spread of colds and flu

Many St. Jude patients are at greater risk for getting sick from flu and other viral infections because of their diseases and treatments. We need your help to protect the health of your child and all St. Jude patients. The flu virus is spread from person-to-person through coughing or sneezing.

Droplet precautions

There are different types of infections, and they require different types of isolation. This handout gives hospital guidelines for droplet precautions.

Dry Skin

Dry skin is dead skin, and dead skin is food for bacteria. Dry skin decreases the strength of the skin and makes it easy to tear open. These open areas are a great place for an infection to start.

Fever and neutropenia

See this handout to learn about fever and to understand how someone with neutropenia is at high risk for infection.

How to prevent infection

Your child's disease or its treatments may weaken his immune system. While you are at the hospital these guidelines help ensure the health of your child and every St. Jude patient.

How to take a temperature

Fever in children may mean an infection is present. You need to know how to take your child's temperature correctly so you can report fever to the doctor.

How to use an N-95 mask

Instructions for using an N-95 mask.

Influenza (flu) vaccine

In this handout, learn how to prevent influenza (flu) and how and why the flu vaccine is given.

Inpatient isolation to help prevent infection

The doctor has placed your child in isolation because he has an infection that could spread to other patients in the hospital. Isolation is used to help prevent the spread of infection.

Isolation in St. Jude housing

This handout explains why isolation is needed and how isolation will be handled in St. Jude housing.

Pressure ulcers (bedsores)

A pressure ulcer is a place where the skin is damaged from pressing against a bed, chair, or other surface.

Special airborne precautions

There are different types of infections, and they require different types of isolation. This handout gives hospital guidelines for special airborne precautions.

Temperature conversion

Centigrade and Fahrenheit tables for temperature conversion.

The signs of infection

Learn to spot the signs of possible infection in your child.

VRE (vancomycin-resistant enterococci)

Enterococci are germs that can live in your intestine (in your belly) and can be in normal bowel movements. Sometimes, these germs can make you sick.