St. Jude patient Kane, age 17, blood cancer

Kane tackles cancer

When Kane was diagnosed with blood cancer, his future in sports became uncertain. St. Jude is helping him find a way to play once again.

 

Kane, whose very first word was “ball,” loves sports. He’s an athletic teen who played basketball, baseball and football. But in January 2015, Kane’s energy began to wane. He slept all the time, and he couldn’t keep up in practice.

After initially being treated for a sinus infection, a blood test revealed Kane suffered from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a type of blood cancer. Kane was transported by ambulance to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for treatment.

Kane’s mom, Michelle, is grateful Kane landed at St. Jude. “You see where the money goes when people fund St. Jude,” she explained. “You see that money cares for your kid. It cures your kid. The level of care is beyond what’s required.”  St. Jude is leading the way the world understands, treats and defeats childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases.

 
 

St. Jude patient Kane with his mom, Michelle

Kane’s treatment included two-and-a-half years of chemotherapy, which he finished in the fall of 2017. “We love St. Jude and will spend the rest of our lives thanking them for saving him,” said Michelle.

The end of Kane’s treatment also coincided with the beginning of Kane’s senior year in high school, and three days before his first football game of this season. Kane was excited to get back on the field.

My teammates were behind me the whole time. I’m thankful for that.
St. Jude patient Kane

St. Jude patient Kane returning to the football field after completing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

St. Jude patient Kane returning to the football field after completing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

 

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