REPS: Impact of Resistance Training–Protein Supplementation on Lean Muscle Mass in Childhood Cancer Survivors

Category:

Long-term Effects

Diseases Treated:

Long-term effects of childhood cancer

Eligibility Overview:

This is a non-therapeutic clinical trial that is only open to St. Jude patients.

  • Currently enrolled on the SJLIFE protocol
  • 18 to 49 years old
  • At least 10 years post first cancer diagnosis
  • Lives within a 45-minute drive of a Greater Memphis Area ATC Fitness Center
  • Speaks English
  • Low lean mass defined as either:
    • Body fat content of at least 25% in males or at least 35% in females OR
    • Age and sex-specific Relative Lean Muscle Mass Standard Deviation score <-1.0

Description

This study is enrolling survivors of childhood cancer who were treated at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and are participating in SJLIFE.  The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of resistance training (weight lifting) combined with either a protein supplement or energy drink on changes in lean muscle mass in young adults who were treated for childhood cancer.  There have been no exercise intervention studies among childhood cancer survivors specifically designed to evaluate the effects of resistance training on muscle mass. However, there are studies among those with chronic diseases, including survivors of adult onset cancers indicating resistance training improves muscle mass, muscle strength, mobility vitality, and physical activity levels.  Resistance training is designed to improve muscular fitness by exercising a muscle or muscle group against external resistance. The doctors are conducting this study because of the prevalence of low lean muscle mass among childhood cancer survivors. Low lean muscle mass is associated with loss of overall body strength, declining mobility, and eventually loss of independence. Among childhood cancer survivors, low lean muscle mass may contribute to a reduction in physical functioning and a sense of fatigue with exertion limiting the ability to participate in adequate physical activity. 

Objectives

  • To evaluate the effects of 24-week resistance training with protein supplementation compared to resistance training with an energy drink on changes in lean muscle mass, muscle strength, walking speed, self-reported exhaustion and physical activity levels among childhood cancer survivors.
  • To evaluate the effects of 24-week resistance training with protein supplementation compared to resistance training with an energy drink on changes in blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, triglycerides, abdominal obesity, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and C-reactive protein among childhood cancer survivors.

Eligibility criteria

Inclusion criteria

  • Currently enrolled on the SJLIFE protocol
  • 18 to 49 years old
  • At least 10 years post first cancer diagnosis
  • Lives within a 45-minute drive of a Greater Memphis Area ATC Fitness Center
  • Speaks English
  • Low lean mass defined as either:
    • Body fat content of at least 25% in males or at least 35% in females OR
    • Age and sex-specific Relative Lean Muscle Mass Standard Deviation score <-1.0

Exclusion criteria

  • Contra-indications to resistance training or protein supplementation
  • Pregnant

Principal Investigator

Kirsten Ness, PhD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Place
Memphis, TN 38105  USA
Voice: 1-888-226-4343 or 901-595-4055
24-Hour Emergency Access Pager: 1-800-349-4334

Referring or consulting clinicians only: protocolinfo@stjude.org
For all other inquiries about St. Jude Children's Research Hospital studies: referralinfo@stjude.org

The above information is intended to provide only a basic description about a research protocol that may be currently active at St. Jude. The details made available here may not be the most up-to-date information on protocols used by St. Jude. To receive full details about a protocol and its status and or use at St. Jude, a physician must contact St. Jude directly.