Defects in LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) associated with Lupus (SJ-16-0025)

St. Jude Reference #SJ-16-0025

Description

Researchers at St. Jude and Washington University showed defects in LAP can cause a lupus-like illness in mice while defects in a related housekeeping process called autophagy did not. This finding is a breakthrough in understanding what causes lupus in some patients. The results lay the foundation for developing novel therapies to control or prevent inflammation and the autoimmune response.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder that occurs when the immune system mistakenly makes antibodies that attack a person’s own tissue. That results in widespread inflammation and potentially life-threatening organ damage. The most common form of the disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), affects an estimated 322,000 U.S. residents, primarily young women. 


 

Keywords

Lupus, autoimmune disorder, inflammation, LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP)


 

Granted Patents or Published Applications


 

Related Scientific References

Noncanonical autophagy inhibits the auto-inflammatory, lupus-like response to dying cells. Nature. Published ahead of print: April 20, 2016. DOI: 10.1038/nature17950


 

Licensing Opportunities

St. Jude is seeking a partner to developing novel therapies to control or prevent inflammation and the autoimmune response and tissue damage associated with the chronic autoimmune disorder lupus.

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