Kindness beyond words from an Oklahoma teacher

Teaching young people is itself an act of love. So when teaching is disrupted, teachers find other ways to foster that bond. During this COVID-19 pandemic, from Florida to Maine and all points west, teachers are connecting with their students in creative – and deeply caring – ways.

Teaching young people is itself an act of love. So when teaching is disrupted, teachers find other ways to foster that bond.

During this COVID-19 pandemic, from Florida to Maine and all points west, teachers are connecting with their students in creative – and deeply caring – ways.

But if there was some special kindness award we could grant, we'd bestow it on Contessa Hubbard Bass, a Special Education teacher in Oklahoma City.

Time and again during social distancing, she has brought the sound of her voice – and a lot of her soul – to a student by dramatically acting out a book to him. All from a safe distance, of course, as he soaks it up from his family's porch. 

Due to a traumatic brain injury sustained when he was a toddler, Demarion has vision, mobility and communication deficits, but the familiar sound of his teacher’s voice provokes an obviously gleeful reaction. On one occasion, Contessa continued to read even when rain began falling.

Demarion’s mom, Edna Pittman-Rouce, has long known that her son’s teacher is remarkably giving of her time and heart. “She treats her students like each one is her favorite. I’ve watched for four years the way she loves on them,” Edna said. “Having her be a part of Demarion’s life is pretty awesome for all of us.”

Contessa gets our special recognition not just for teaching a beloved student, but all of us, what love in action looks like. 

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