St. Jude patient Bella dressed up for Halloween

St. Jude patient Bella dressed up for Halloween

Meet Bella

When Bella was a year old, she began to experience neck pain and stiffness and she kept her neck tilted to one side. An MRI at a hospital near the family’s home in India revealed a mass on Bella’s brain. Devastated, her parents turned to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, full of fear for their daughter’s future. Shortly after arriving at St. Jude, doctors determined the tumor was an anaplastic ependymoma. St. Jude freely shares the breakthroughs it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children.

Bella’s treatment included chemotherapy and proton therapy. “At St. Jude, they are not just thinking of your child’s treatment, they are thinking about what families go through,” said Amit, Bella’s dad. “St. Jude has thought about the issues families face, and you don’t have to worry about anything, you just focus on your child.” Bella is now finished with treatment.

St. Jude patient Sascha

St. Jude patient Sascha

Meet Sascha

For several weeks, Sascha had complained about headaches, but it was the start of a new school year, so it was easy to chalk it up to stress and adjusting to a new routine. When Sascha began having double-vision, her parents took her to the doctor, where they learned she had a cancerous brain tumor called a medulloblastoma. After surgery to remove the tumor, Sascha was referred to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

St. Jude freely shares the discoveries it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children.

“We knew St. Jude was truly the best place for Sascha to receive treatment,” said her dad. Sascha’s treatment included proton therapy and chemotherapy. She also received physical therapy, including yoga, as part of her treatment. Sascha now visits St. Jude for regular checkups. She loves unicorns and making arts and crafts.

St. Jude patient Abraham dressed up for Halloween

St. Jude patient Abraham dressed up for Halloween

Meet Abraham

In February 2018, Abraham’s right eye turned inward. He also started having headaches in the morning and would sometimes throw up. Even watching TV made the little boy’s head hurt. A CT scan finally revealed the cause of Abraham’s issues: He had a mass on his brain, identified as a cancerous brain tumor called a medulloblastoma.

“It was just terrifying,” said his mom. “It broke my heart and made me so scared for him.” At St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Abraham’s treatment included high-dose radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

Abraham’s family will never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing or food – because all a family should worry about is helping their child live. Abraham, who is finished with treatment, returns to St. Jude for regular checkups. He loves playing outside and coloring with his dad. “We’re just so thankful for St. Jude,” his mom said.

St. Jude patient Quincy dressed up for Halloween in a pirate costume

St. Jude patient Quincy dressed up for Halloween in a pirate costume

Meet Quincy

When Quincy couldn’t shake his stomach trouble, his pediatrician had a feeling something more than a virus might be the cause. Scans showed Quincy had a tumor on his right kidney – a type of kidney cancer called Wilms tumor. He was referred immediately to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for treatment. Treatments invented at St. Jude have helped push the overall childhood cancer survival rate from 20 percent to more than 80 percent since it opened more than 50 years ago.

“It’s definitely a whole other world inside these doors,” said Quincy’s mom. “You get a sense that everybody is here fighting the same fight. Everybody has the same goal, and everybody wants the best for the kids.”  Quincy’s treatment included surgery to remove the affected kidney and chemotherapy. He had his last dose of chemotherapy in August 2018 and now visits St. Jude for checkups. Quincy is a wildly imaginative, smart and caring boy.

St. Jude patient Mikey dressed up for Halloween

St. Jude patient Mikey dressed up for Halloween

Meet Mikey

Mikey was 2 months old when his mother, Liliana, noticed a glare in his eyes in photographs. Just three months later, tests revealed Mikey had retinoblastoma, a type of eye cancer. There were tumors in both of his eyes. Doctors in Mexico recommended his eyes be removed. Liliana, desperate to save her son’s vision, obtained a referral to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Soon after arriving at St. Jude, Liliana found hope: St. Jude doctors believed they could save her son’s eyes. St. Jude freely shares the discoveries it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children. Mikey’s treatment included a combination of chemotherapy, laser treatment and cryotherapy. He also received physical, occupational and speech therapies, which helped keep him on track to meet his milestones. Mikey, a playful, happy boy, is finished with treatment and has vision in both eyes.

St. Jude patient Major

St. Jude patient Major

Meet Major

Shortly after Major was born, tests revealed he suffered from sickle cell disease, which is a group of inherited blood disorders that prevent the normal flow of blood in the body. At St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Major’s treatment includes hydroxyurea.

St. Jude is leading the way the world understands, treats and defeats childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases, such as sickle cell disease.

Major’s family was already familiar with St. Jude, as two of his older siblings also have sickle cell disease and are St. Jude patients. “I’m so thankful for St. Jude,” said the children’s mom, Demetrius. “The doctors and nurses are so helpful, and everyone treats us like family.” Major is a mischievous, cheerful boy who loves Paw Patrol.

St. Jude patient Raeleigh dressed up for Halloween in a lion costume

St. Jude patient Raeleigh dressed up for Halloween in a lion costume

Meet Raeleigh

When Raeleigh was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, her family turned to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Treatments invented at St. Jude have helped push the overall childhood cancer survival rate from 20 percent to more than 80 percent since it opened more than 50 years ago. St. Jude is working to drive the overall survival rate for childhood cancer to 90 percent.

Raeleigh’ s treatment will include two-and-a-half years of chemotherapy and so far, she is handling it like a champ. “She's basically your normal child,” said her mom, “no side effects, no nausea, no throwing up.” Raeleigh, who loves clothes and dressing up, is described by her parents as smart, independent and bossy. At St. Jude, her favorite thing is playing in the playrooms. Her parents love the environment and how caring everyone is. “They go a step beyond to make sure you’re comfortable and that Raeleigh is doing well,” said her mom.

Families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing or food — because all a family should worry about is helping their child live.

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