Use of Amylase or Maltose to Treat or Prevent Neurodegeneration (SJ-20-0009)

St. Jude Reference #SJ-20-0009

Description

There is no clinical therapeutic to stop the progression of neurodegenerative diseases or that preserves brain function during aging. A collapse in proteostasis and loss of protein quality control are important causes of age-related neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and others). Neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is a defining sign of aging that is influenced by peripheral tissues. Clinical observations indicate skeletal muscle influences CNS aging, but the signaling remains unexplored.

Studying proteostasis in fruit flies (Drosophila) and human brain organoids, researchers at St. Jude found a protective stress response that through muscle-secreted Amyrel amylase signaling preserves protein quality control in the retina and brain during aging. Their work indicates that Amylase, SLC45 maltose transporters, and maltose-based therapies may oppose and retard the development of neurodegenerative diseases by preventing the accumulation of faulty (misfolded) proteins and protein aggregates in the retina and brain during aging. Their invention consists of amylase- and maltose-based interventions for preserving protein quality control and tissue function during aging and for preventing age- and disease-associated neurodegeneration via amylase/maltose-induced signaling.


Keywords

Muscle-to-brain signaling, aging, myokine, proteasome, stress response, proteostasis, amylase, maltose, brain organoids, muscle-to-retina signaling, Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington.


Granted Patents or Published Applications

Application filed, available under confidentiality


Related Scientific References

Mamta Rai, Zane Coleman, Michelle Curley, Anjana Nityanandam, Fabio Demontis. “Proteasome stress in skeletal muscle mounts a long-range protective response that delays retinal and brain aging.”

Cell Metabolism 2021 Mar 23:S1550-4131(21)00112-1. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2021.03.005. Online ahead of print. PMID: 33773104. The article is freely accessible from this link:   https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1cofa5WXUlLHQX


Licensing Opportunities

We are seeking partners to develop amylase- and maltose-based interventions (including nutraceutical approaches, injection of recombinant amylase, and gene therapy to boost levels of amylase and/or of SLC45 maltose transporters) for preserving protein quality control and tissue function during aging and for preventing age- and disease-associated neurodegeneration via amylase/maltose-induced signaling.  Contact: chad.riggs@stjude.org

Contact the Office of Technology Licensing (Phone: 901-595-2342, Fax: 901-595-3148) for more information.