Kiri Ness, Ph.D., of St. Jude receives award for outstanding contributions to professional literature from American Physical Therapy Association

Kiri Ness, Ph.D., is the 2020 recipient of the Helen J. Hislop Award for Outstanding Contributions to Professional Literature

Memphis, Tennessee, June 9, 2020

Researcher in black shirt looks at camera.

Kiri Ness, Ph.D., has won the Helen J. Hislop Award for Outstanding Contributions to Professional Literature from the American Physical Therapy Association.

Kiri Ness, Ph.D., a physical therapist and faculty member in the Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, has been named the 2020 recipient of the Helen J. Hislop Award for Outstanding Contributions to Professional Literature from the American Physical Therapy Association.

The annual Helen J. Hislop Award honors a physical therapist who has been actively engaged in writing and publishing professional literature pertaining to the physical therapy profession for at least 10 years.

Ness joined St. Jude in 2006, and has more than 275 peer-reviewed publications. Her research focuses on recognizing, describing and remediating functional limitations in childhood cancer survivors; exercise, physical activity and dietary intervention to prevent and remediate frail health; and accelerated aging in cancer survivors.

“I am so honored to receive this award from my physical therapy peers,” Ness said. “My training and experience as a physical therapist provide me with the foundation for the research I do today, designed to improve physical function and performance in children with cancer and among cancer survivors.”

Ness earned a bachelor’s degree at College of St. Scholastica; a master’s degree at Augsburg College; and a master’s of public health and doctoral degrees from the University of Minnesota.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is leading the way the world understands, treats and cures childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. It is the only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center devoted solely to children. Treatments developed at St. Jude have helped push the overall childhood cancer survival rate from 20 percent to 80 percent since the hospital opened more than 50 years ago. St. Jude freely shares the breakthroughs it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children. Families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing and food — because all a family should worry about is helping their child live. To learn more, visit stjude.org or follow St. Jude on social media at @stjuderesearch.

 
 

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