St. Jude researchers among the most highly cited in 2019

Memphis, Tennessee, November 22, 2019

Foreground shows several test tubes in a box case. Background shows someone reading a lab notebook.

Eighteen scientists from St. Jude are on Web of Science’s 2019 list of the most cited researchers, highlighting the importance of their work to the broader scientific community.

Eighteen scientists from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital were recently named Highly Cited Researchers for 2019 by the Web of Science Group.  

The annual list identifies scientists and social scientists who produced multiple papers ranking in the top 1% by citations for their field and year of publication. The ranking demonstrates significant research influence among their peers.

The 2019 St. Jude Highly Cited Researchers are:

The methodology that determines the who’s who of influential researchers draws on the data and analysis performed by bibliometric experts from the Institute for Scientific Information at the Web of Science Group.

The data are taken from 21 broad research fields within Essential Science Indicators, a component of InCites. The fields are defined by sets of journals and, in the case of multidisciplinary journals such as Nature and Science, by a paper-by-paper assignment to a field based on an analysis of the cited references in the papers. This percentile-based selection method removes the citation advantage of older papers relative to recently published ones, since papers are weighed against others in the same annual cohort.

The full 2019 Highly Cited Researchers list and executive summary can be found here, and the methodology can be found here.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is leading the way the world understands, treats and cures childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. It is the only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center devoted solely to children. Treatments developed at St. Jude have helped push the overall childhood cancer survival rate from 20 percent to 80 percent since the hospital opened more than 50 years ago. St. Jude freely shares the breakthroughs it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children. Families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing and food — because all a family should worry about is helping their child live. To learn more, visit stjude.org or follow St. Jude on social media at @stjuderesearch.