St. Jude at AACR 2019

The 2019 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting features research, resources and expertise from St. Jude investigators

Scientists from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital will present research at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting. The five-day international conference begins March 29 in Atlanta.

Team Science

On Sunday, the Cancer Control and Survivorship Program at St. Jude will receive the 13th AACR Team Science Award during the meeting’s opening ceremony. The award recognizes innovative, interdisciplinary research that has advanced understanding or treatment of cancer. Read the Press Release.

St. Jude Cloud

St. Jude Cloud will showcase its growth since the data-sharing platform premiered at the 2018 AACR annual meeting. The platform now includes 10,000 sequenced whole genomes from pediatric cancer patients, survivors and others.

Visit our Booths

St. Jude Cloud at #4136
Academic Programs and Recruitment at #4139
Cancer & Biomedical Research Career Fair at #CF303


 

Educational Sessions

Genetic Predispositions to Childhood Leukemias: Implications for Pathogenesis and Screening

Friday, March 29
Room A302
Educational Session ED32

5:15 – 5:40 p.m.
Jun J. Yang, PhD, of the Hematological Malignancies Program, will discuss 10 years of genomic discovery regarding inherited susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Jun J. Yang portrait

6:15 – 6:40 p.m.
Jeffery Klco, MD, PhD, of Department of Pathology, will discuss the recently identified pediatric myeloid disease disposition genes SAMD9 and SAMD9L.

Jeffrey Klco portrait

Advances in Organ Site Research: Genetic Predisposition in Hematologic Malignancies

Monday, April 1
Room B401
Educational Session AOS01

1:30 – 1:55 p.m.
Jeffery Klco, MD, PhD, of Department of Pathology, will discuss genetic data and mechanistic insights into the emerging syndrome of germline SAMD9/SAMD9L mutations in childhood myelodysplasia and monosomy 7.

Jeffrey Klco portrait

2:00 – 2:25 p.m.
Charles Mullighan, MBBS, MD, of the Department of Pathology, will discuss germline determinants of susceptibility and drug response in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Mullighan is also chairing the session.

Charles Mullighan portrait

Science of Survivorship: The intersection of survivorship and aging

Monday, April 1
Georgia Ballroom 3 - Building C
Forum FO07-297

5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
Kirsten Ness, PhD, of the Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, will participate in a forum about the biologic intersection of cancer and aging, including the increased risk for frailty and chronic health conditions in childhood cancer survivors.

Kristen Ness portrait

 

Poster Sessions

  1. 1:00 - 5:00 p.m.

    Clinical genomic sequencing uncovers potentially targetable truncations and fusions in MAP3K8 in spitzoid and other melanomas

    Scott Newman, PhD, of the Department of Computational Biology
    Cancer Genomics 1
    Section 33
    Presentation Number: 731

  2. 8:00 a.m. - Noon

    Acquisition of drug resistance mutations during chemotherapy treatment in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Samuel Brady, PhD, of the Department of Computational Biology
    Targets and Therapies in Pediatric Cancer
    Section 6
    Presentation Number: 2872

    Analysis of error profiles in deep next-generation sequencing data

    Xiaotu Ma, PhD, of the Department of Computational Biology
    High-throughput Sequencing
    Section 36
    Presentation Number: 3538

     

    1:00 - 5:00 p.m.

    Increased prevalence of germline monoallelic RECQL4 mutations in children with cancer

    Jamie Maciaszek, PhD, of the Department of Oncology
    Biology and Signaling in Pediatric Cancer
    Section 2
    Presentation Number: 3651

    USP7 heterozygous loss-of-function affects T-cell differentiation in pediatric T-ALL

    Timothy Shaw, PhD, of the Department of Computational Biology
    Biology and Signaling in Pediatric Cancer
    Section 2
    Presentation Number: 3652

    Visualize 10,000 whole-genomes from pediatric cancer patients on St. Jude Cloud

    Clay McLeod, of the Department of Computational Biology
    Biology and Signaling in Pediatric Cancer
    Section 2
    Presentation Number: 3671

    Single-cell characterization and lineage tracking of recurrent pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma

    Anand Patel, MD, of the Department of Oncology
    Tumor Evolution and Heterogeneity 2
    Section 7
    Presentation Number: 3768

    Germline mutations in BRCA2 and pediatric/adolescent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime (SJLIFE) and Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohorts

    Zhaoming Wang, PhD, of the Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control
    Cancer Predisposition
    Section 26
    Presentation Number: 4178

  3. 8:00 a.m. - Noon

    Modeling the vascular sarcoma spectrum with genetically engineered mice

    Jason Hanna, PhD, of the Department of Oncology
    Mouse Models
    Section 6
    Presentation Number: 4631

    Whole-genome sequencing of childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy identifies 5p15.33 locus for stroke: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort (SJLIFE) study

    Yadav Sapkota, PhD, of the Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control
    Supportive  Care and Survivorship Research/Outcome Research
    Section 20
    Presentation Number: 4909

    Researchers at St. Jude have identified a chromosomal region associated with an increased risk of stroke among adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial radiation therapy. This investigation draws on whole genome sequencing data gathered through the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort (SJLIFE) study. The investigators found a significant association between variants on a chromosomal region called 5p15.33, dose level of cranial radiation therapy and risk of stroke. These results suggest that testing for variants of 5p15.33 may be useful for identifying patients who, when treated with cranial radiation therapy, will be at a high-risk of stroke as adults. “This is one of the first studies to evaluate the genomic underpinnings of stroke in such a robust cohort,” said Yadav Sapkota, PhD, of the St. Jude Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control.

    Acute depletion of CTCF directly affects MYC regulation through loss of enhance-promoter looping

    Chunliang Li, PhD, of the Department of Tumor Cell Biology
    Mechanisms and Consequences of Transcriptional Deregulation
    Section 36
    Presentation Number: 5228

    Genomic instability and the development of high-grade glioma

    Lee Pribyl, of the Department of Genetics
    Late-Breaking Research: Molecular and Cellular Biology/Genetics 2
    Section 41
    Presentation Number: LB-289


 

Visit St. Jude Cloud at Booth #4136

Representatives from St. Jude Cloud will be available to answer questions in the Exhibit Hall at Booth #4136. Learn about the unique resources and data available for researchers, including GenomePaint. Attend a demonstration:

Making Discoveries on St. Jude Cloud

Scott Newman, PhD
Monday, April 1 at 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, April 2 at 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Announcing and Investigating GenomePaint

Alex Gout, PhD
Monday, April 1 at 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Tuesday, April 2 at 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Get updates from St. Jude Cloud


 

Visit St. Jude Academic Programs and Recruiting at Booth #4139

Representatives from the St. Jude Office of Academic Programs and the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Graduate School for Biomedical Sciences will be available to answer questions in the Exhibit Hall at Booth #4139.


 

Join Us at the AACR Cancer & Biomedical Research Career Fair at Booth #CF303

Saturday, March 30
9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Booth CF303

Representatives from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital will be available to answer questions on positions for post-docs, researchers, clinical fellows and more.

Learn more about the AACR Career Fair