SJHOME: At-Home Care after Stem Cell Transplant

Health and Outpatient Management Experiences

Categories:

Bone Marrow Transplant

Psychology

Diseases Treated:

Non-therapeutic

Eligibility Overview:

This is a non-therapeutic clinical trial open only to St. Jude patients.

  • 12 years old or younger
  • Has had a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCST)
  • Recruitment occurs within two weeks before or after discharge from transplant admission
  • Prescribed oral medication at discharge
  • Speaks and reads English
  1. Brief Summary

    Children who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplants receive comprehensive care from medical professionals while hospitalized. After discharge, however, that responsibility is transferred to the parents or other caregivers. 

    The post-transplant regimen is complex, particularly during the initial seven months following HCST. Caregivers must manage frequent and changing medications and dosages, strict nutritional requirements and follow-up clinical appointments to prevent life-threatening infections and graft versus host disease. Such highly-complex regimens are often associated with poorer adherence and medical outcomes.

    This study will assess adherence to the pediatric post-HSCT regimen to identify modifiable variables and inform the development of targeted interventions to prevent non-adherence.

    Primary Objective

    The main goal of this study is to test a model to predict outpatient regimen adherence in children who have received a stem cell transplant.

    Eligibility Criteria

    Inclusion criteria include:

    • 12 years old or younger
    • Has had a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCST)
    • Recruitment occurs within two weeks before or after discharge from transplant admission
    • Prescribed oral medication at discharge
    • Speaks and reads English 
    • St. Jude patient

    Exclusion Criteria include:

    • No consistent caregiver 
    • Caregiver unable to complete questionnaires
    • Caregiver does not speak English

    Study Sites

    St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
    Memphis, Tennessee

    Collaborating sites in the U.S.

  2. About this study

    Stem cells are produced in the spongy area of bones known as the bone marrow. A stem cell transplant replaces damaged or destroyed bone marrow stem cells with healthy ones. Stem cell transplants, also known as bone marrow transplants, are used to treat cancer and other diseases.

    A patient who has a stem cell transplant must take medicine and come to the doctor for follow-up appointments after discharge from the hospital. When the patient is a child, it is the responsibility of the parent or other home caregiver to be sure this follow-up care is provided.

    Purpose of this clinical trial

    The main purpose of this study is to understand how children and their parents manage follow-up care after a stem cell transplant. Researchers also want to understand how this care affects future hospitalizations and infections after transplant.

    Eligibility overview

    • 12 years old or younger
    • Has had a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCST)
    • Recruitment occurs within two weeks before or after discharge from transplant admission
    • Prescribed oral medication at discharge
    • Speaks and reads English 
    • St. Jude patient
  3. SJHOME Quick View
    Sponsors National Institutes of Health
    Trial Start Date February 2017
    Estimated Enrollment 281 nationwide
    Study Type Non-therapeutic
    Conditions Stem cell transplant
    Ages 12 years old and younger
    Principal investigator Sean Phipps, PhD (St. Jude)
    Study Sites St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and collaborating sites in the U.S.
    For a consultation or to discuss SJHOME St. Jude Physician/Patient Referral Office
    1-888-226-4343
    referralinfo@stjude.org

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Place
Memphis, TN 38105  USA
Voice: 1-888-226-4343 or 901-595-4055
24-Hour Emergency Access Pager: 1-800-349-4334
Email: referralinfo@stjude.org

The above information is intended to provide only a basic description about a research protocol that may be currently active at St. Jude. The details made available here may not be the most up-to-date information on protocols used by St. Jude. To receive full details about a protocol and its status and or use at St. Jude, a physician must contact St. Jude directly.