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Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Treatment

Also called: acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, AML

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is a soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of many bones. It makes blood cells.

In AML, the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells that do not work correctly. Children with AML do not have enough healthy white blood cells. As a result, they cannot fight infections well. Children with AML can get very sick.

AML is the second most common form of childhood leukemia.

Learn more about acute myeloid leukemia on the Together by St. Jude™ online resource.

Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

Chemotherapy is the main treatment for AML. It has 2 phases. Treatment takes about 6 months.

In some cases, children may have a stem cell (bone marrow) transplant. Another possible treatment is immunotherapy. In rare cases, children may have radiation therapy.

Treatment plans are based on several factors. These include the child’s age and white blood cell count before treatment.


Acute myeloid leukemia clinical trials

St. Jude offers clinical trials and cancer research studies for children, teens, and young adults for AML. Learn more about clinical research at St. Jude.

Recruiting
RAVAML: Revumenib, Azacitidine, and Venetoclax for Pediatric AML

Study goal:

Find out the dose of revumenib, azacitidine and venetoclax that can be used to safely treat children, adolescents, and young adults with refractory or relapsed AML or ALAL

Age:

1–30 years old

Recruiting
APAL2020D: Venetoclax in Children with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Study goal:

To find out if adding venetoclax to standard chemotherapy leads to improved survival for children and young adults with relapsed AML.

Age:

29 days old to 21 years old

Recruiting
AML23: Venetoclax and Conventional Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Study goal:

Study the side effects of using venetoclax and chemotherapy to treat children with AML; learn more about how this treatment works

Age:

Older than 28 days and younger than 22 years

Recruiting
CATCHAML: CAR T-Cell Therapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

Study goal:

The main purpose of this study is to find the highest dose of CD123-CAR T cells that is safe to give patients with AML.  We also want to study the side effects of the treatment and learn how effective it is in fighting this type of cancer.

Age:

21 years old or younger

Recruiting
REF2HCT: Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia, Lymphoma, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome After an Earlier Transplant

Study goal:

The main goal of this study is to learn about the good and bad effects of transplanting blood cells donated by a family member to children and young adults with cancer that has come back or did not improve after a previous bone marrow transplant.

Age:

21 years old and younger

Recruiting
PAINBDY1: Treating Pain in Children with Cancer: Pain Buddy

Study goal:

The main goal of this research study is to help us learn how to better treat pain and symptoms in children going through chemotherapy cancer treatment.

Age:

8 to 18 years old

Recruiting
SELCLAX: A Study of Venetoclax and Selinexor with Chemotherapy in Children with AML

Study goal:

The main goals of this study are to test the safety of venetoclax and selinexor and find the highest dose that is safe to give when combined with chemotherapy drugs. Researchers also want to find out about any side effects and learn how the treatment affects your body.

Age:

30 years or younger

Recruiting
TRIALS: Transfusional Iron Overload Among Leukemia Survivors

Study goal:

1) To find out how many long-term survivors of leukemia have iron overload by using MRI testing. 2) To study how the number of red blood cell transfusions you received determines whether you have iron overload. 3) To explore how your age at the time of cancer therapy, the length of time from therapy, and gender affects whether you develop iron overload. 4) To find out if iron overload is causing problems with your organs.

Recruiting
CPXSMN: CPX-351 in Pediatric Patients with Secondary Myeloid Neoplasms

Study goal:

This study will help us understand the effects of CPX-351 treatment in patients with MDS and AML.

Age:

1-22 years old

Recruiting
DIRECT70: CAR T–Cell Therapy for Children with Blood Malignancies

Study goal:

The purpose of this study is to find the highest dose of CD70+ CAR cells that is safe to give to patients with CD70+ blood cancers.

Age:

Up to 21 years old


Acute myeloid leukemia care at St. Jude

St. Jude provides the highest quality of care for patients with AML:

  • We are consistently ranked among the best childhood cancer centers in the nation by US News & World Report.
  • At St. Jude, we have created an environment where children can be children and families can be together. 
  • We lead more clinical trials for childhood cancer than any other hospital in the U.S. 
  • St. Jude is the only National Cancer Institute–designated Comprehensive Cancer Center just for children. A Comprehensive Cancer Center meets rigorous standards for research that develops new and better approaches to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer.
  • The nurse-to-patient ratio at St. Jude is about 1:3 in hematology and oncology and 1:1 in the Intensive Care Unit.
  • Patients may be able to get expert, compassionate care and treatment closer to their homes through our St. Jude Affiliate clinics.
  • St. Jude offers a dedicated team of specialists to meet the needs of children with cancer, including:
A statue of children running and holding hands

Seeking treatment at St. Jude

Patients accepted to St. Jude must have a disease we treat and must be referred by a physician or other qualified medical professional. We accept most patients based on their ability to enroll in an open clinical trial.

How to seek treatment

Contact the Physician / Patient Referral Office

Call: 1-888-226-4343 (toll-free) or 901-595-4055 (local)  | Fax: 901-595-4011 | Email: referralinfo@stjude.org | 24-hour pager: 1-800-349-4334

 

Learn more